… for Apple Motion

Tip #376: Use Walk 3D View to Position Cameras

Larry Jordan – LarryJordan.com

Walk 3D offers a more intuitive way to position a camera.

The Walk 3D View control in Apple Motion.

Topic $TipTopic

This first appeared in an Apple KnowledgeBase article.

The Walk 3D View tool lets you position a camera in 3D space as you would in a computer game, using a keyboard-and-mouse navigation method.

  • In Motion, select a camera, click and hold the view tools pop-up menu in the canvas toolbar, then choose Walk 3D View. The pointer changes to indicate that the Walk 3D View tool is active.
  • Use the Up, Down, Right, or Left Arrow keys to move the camera in 3D space; press and hold the Option key while using the arrow keys to move the camera more slowly. You can also drag in the canvas to orient the camera.

NOTE: The Walk 3D View tool is available only when Active Camera, Camera, or Perspective is selected from the Camera pop-up menu.


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… for Apple Motion

Tip #341: Uses for Emoji in Motion

Larry Jordan – LarryJordan.com

Emojis add interest to any title and greater clarity to labels.

The emoji panel in Apple Motion.

Topic $TipTopic

You may have missed the memo, I certainly did, but we can now add emojis in any field that accepts text; including layer labels! Here’s how.

  • In Motion, open any object that allows you to type text. For example, titles, layer labels, even some parameter names.
  • Type Control + Cmd + Spacebar. This displays the emoji panel.
  • Double-click any emoji icon to add it to the text field.

Now that I’ve discovered how this works, I’m adding emojis everywhere!


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… for Visual Effects

Tip #382: Stacking Order Makes a Difference

Larry Jordan – LarryJordan.com

Effects process from top to bottom

Two effects are applied to this clip: On the left, Sepia on top, Border under. On the right, the order is reversed.

Topic $TipTopic

Whether you use Adobe Premiere or Apple Final Cut, the stacking order of your effects makes a difference. Let me illustrate.

In this screen shot, the clip has two effects applied: Sepia and Border. On the left side, Sepia is above the border. So the image is first colorized, then the cyan border is added.

With the image on the right, the Border is on top. This means that the border is added, then both border and image are converted from full-color to Sepia.

If you apply more than one effect to a clip, remember that effects process from top to bottom. You can see the order of your effects in the Inspector (Final Cut) or Effect Controls panel (Premiere).


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… for Visual Effects

Tip #371: Changing Clip Frame Rates in Resolve

 

The trick is to duplicate your clip first.

Topic $TipTopic

This article, by Lewis McGregor, first appeared in PremiumBeat. Do you need two clips from the same video file to play at different frame rates in your DaVinci Resolve timeline – say to create slow-motion? Here’s how.

To change a video clip recorded at a higher frame rate to a lower frame rate to achieve slow motion in Resolve:

  • Right-click a media clip in the media pool (or timeline) and open the clip attributes.
  • Change the frame rate to match your project settings.

However, the problem is that you are changing the base attributes of the clip that exist within the media pool. To fix this, either:

  • Adjust the speed percentage of the second clip.
  • Duplicate the clip in the media pool, then change the clip attributes. By duplicating the media in the media pool, we are creating a new clip from Resolve’s perspective, which allows us to change the frame rate of the second clip without affecting the first clip.

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… for Visual Effects

Tip #370: 4 Steps to Better Skin Tones in Resolve

Larry Jordan – LarryJordan.com

Quick steps to improve skin without damaging the rest of your color grade.

Color wheels in DaVinci Resolve.

Topic $TipTopic

This article, written by Rubidium Wu, first appeared in PremiumBeat.

In this tip, we’re going to use DaVinci Resolve to improve skin tones, without affecting other color edits. Here’s how.

  • Make a Mask. In a new node, select the qualifying tool, and drag it across the most even and representative part of the face. Increasing the clean white also helps a lot.
  • Unify Tone. Once you have the skin isolated, increase the contrast and look for yellow, red, or green areas that don’t fit with the overall skin tone. In the Curves menu, select Hue vs. Hue, then select those colors using the curve up or down to shift the problem colors back to the central color.
  • Pare Imperfections. In the color tab, adjust the slider marked MD for Midtone Density. Turning this down gets rid of contrast in the skin, effectively hiding imperfections.
  • Separate. The last step is to add another node, then hit Option+L to turn this into a layer mixer node. Dragging the blue alpha arrow of the skin mask to the input on the lower of the two mixed nodes means that your skin grade will “pass around” anything done in the latter nodes. This lets you cool down the background — or desaturate it — without also affecting the skin.

Done.


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… for Codecs & Media

Tip #380: Apple Compressor vs. Adobe Media Encoder

Larry Jordan – LarryJordan.com

Adobe Media Encoder is still the fastest.

AME (green) is faster than Compressor (blue) in 2 out of 3 compression formats. (Shorter bars are faster.)

Topic $TipTopic

Recently, I compared the compression speed of Adobe Media Encoder with Apple Compressor, both running on the same 27″ iMac (i5) and macOS Catalina. Here’s what I learned.

  • In general, Catalina is a shade slower for both apps than Mojave for compression, ranging from 0% to 14% slower, depending upon the task.
  • HEVC 10-bit compression is still extremely slow because it is not hardware-accelerated in either app.
  • Compressed file sizes are the same for both apps between Mojave and Catalina.

As you can see from the chart, while Media Encoder and Compressor are the about the same speed for HEVC 8-bit, Media Encoder is much faster for H.264 (50%) and HEVC 10-bit (180%).

EXTRA CREDIT

Read the full article with all the details here.


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… for Codecs & Media

Tip #374: Constant Bitrate vs. Constant Quality

Larry Jordan – LarryJordan.com

Two new encoding options for Blackmagic RAW media.

Topic $TipTopic

This article, written by Lewis MaGregor, first appeared in PremiumBeat. Let’s take a quick look at the two new encoding options in Blackmagic RAW.

  • Constant Bitrate. This makes sure your file sizes remain predictable and manageable because your media is never going to surpass the selected data rate. While Constant Bitrate is a surefire setting, to make sure the file sizes and quality will remain as advertised, it may cause issues when the footage being captured could do without the extra compression, ensuring that all details of a busy scene are clear.
  • Constant Quality. This has a variable bitrate with no upper data limit. This means if you’re filming a wedding and the guests start throwing confetti and rice, and more objects enter into focus, the bitrate will adjust to account for the increase in complex frame information, maintaining the overall quality of the entire image. Of course, this comes with larger file sizes that you can’t predict.

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… for Codecs & Media

Tip #350: Isaac Newton’s Color Wheel

Larry Jordan – LarryJordan.com

The Color Wheel is almost 400 years old!

A modern color wheel, modeled after Sir Isaac Newton’s initial work.

Topic $TipTopic

I was reading Blain Brown‘s excellent book, Digital Imaging, earlier this week and discovered that the color wheel that we use virtually every day was invented by Isaac Newton in 1666.

It started with Newton passing light through a prism to reveal the spectrum of light. While the spectrum of light is linear, Newton’s insight was to connect the two ends to form a circle. This made it much easier to see the relationships between primary (red, green and blue) colors with secondary (yellow, cyan, and magenta) colors.

His experiments led to the theory that red, yellow and blue were the primary colors from which all other colors are derived.  While that’s not entirely true, it’s still influential in the color wheels developed in the early 1800s as well as the color wheel currently used today. Add to his initial work the secondary colors of violet, orange and green—those which result from mixing the primary colors—and the color wheel begins to take shape.

EXTRA CREDIT

The secondary colors – yellow and cyan – exist in the color spectrum and are formed by combining two primary colors. While magenta is formed by combining red and blue, they are at opposite ends of the color spectrum, which means that magenta, while a color, is not in the color spectrum!


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… for Adobe Premiere Pro CC

Tip #288: How to Do a Match Frame Edit

Larry Jordan – LarryJordan.com

Match frame edits are a very fast way to find the source clip.

The Premiere Pro CC Source Monitor.
A Match Frame edit loaded into the Source Monitor, matching the In, Out and playhead.

Topic $TipTopic

Let’s say you are editing the video of a clip into the timeline, only to realize, later in your edit, that you also needed the audio. How do you fix this quickly?

The answer is a Match Frame edit.

  • In the timeline, put your playhead in the clip you want to locate and type F.

This opens the source clip into the Source Monitor, matching the position of the In, Out and playhead of the clip in the Timeline.

From there you can edit whatever you need back into the Timeline.


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… for Adobe Premiere Pro CC

Tip #287: What Do These Blue Boxes Do?

Larry Jordan – LarryJordan.com

Blue buttons simplify complex audio and video routing tasks.

The track header section of the Premiere timeline.

Topic $TipTopic

The Track Header on the left side of the Premiere timeline has two columns of blue buttons. Here’s what they do.

It is important to remember that there is no relationship between the two sets of buttons.

The blue buttons on the left side act as a “patch panel.” They determine which tracks from a clip in the Source Monitor or Project panel edit to specific tracks in the Timeline. For example, to edit audio only, turn OFF all blue buttons attached to video tracks.

The blue buttons on the right side determine which Timeline tracks are active. This affects copy/paste operations as well as selecting and cutting tracks.

  • To turn off a blue button click it.
  • To turn off, or on, all audio or all video buttons, Shift-click one of them.
  • To change the position of a button, drag it.

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