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Tip #1742: Premiere Beta Showcases New Interface

Larry Jordan – LarryJordan.com

Adobe begins modernizing Premiere Pro for today’s media.

Image courtesy of Adobe Systems.

Topic $TipTopic

Last week, Adobe released a significant update to Premiere Pro as a beta release. This is the first step in a multi-step process to overhaul and refresh the Premiere interface.

NOTE: Beta software, by definition, is unstable and likely to change. You can install the beta version without losing access to the current release of Premiere. However, use beta software only for exploration and experimentation; because there is always the possibility of losing your work due to a software bug.

Adobe writes: “Our new vision for Premiere Pro starts with refreshed import and export experiences, as well as a streamlined header bar — making workflows easier to learn, more efficient and more enjoyable. We want Premiere Pro to become a more intuitive, yet powerful editing tool that is ready to meet the demands of tomorrow while also helping today’s creators to meet the demands of delivering high-quality content at quick turnarounds and optimizing content for multiple social platforms.

“This interface refresh is a journey that has been a long time coming. It’s a nuanced challenge to take a thirty-year-old app and modernize it for new types of video content (like social video which simply didn’t exist when Premiere Pro was first built), while respecting the needs and demands of traditional post-production. We knew we had to get it right, so we brought together a cross-functional team from product design, research, engineering and customer experience, who collected data and worked closely with our customers on their wants and needs to ensure the new experience is as beautiful as it is functional.”

The changes in this version focus on three areas:

  • Streamlining the header bar and workspaces
  • Improve the import process
  • Improve the export process

Adobe concludes: “We’ll be rolling out these new experiences on a timeline starting with this public Beta to ensure that our customers can provide feedback, explore the changes and continue to use Premiere Pro to its fullest potential. These changes are additive and not a replacement to current workflows. We understand how important muscle-memory is and we don’t want to disrupt your flow in any way.”

Here’s a link to Adobe’s blog with more details.


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Tip #1743: Adobe Cleans Up the Header Bar

Larry Jordan – LarryJordan.com

Adobe’s on-going interface cleanup continues in the Header Bar.

New Premiere Pro header bar. Left side on top, right side on the bottom.

Topic $TipTopic In the beta release of Adobe Premiere Pro last week, Adobe cleaned up the Header Bar. While the big news surrounds the new import and export workflows, the newly-cleaned-up look of the Header Bar is also worth mentioning.

NOTE: Beta software, by definition, is unstable and likely to change. You can install the beta version without losing access to the current release of Premiere. However, use beta software only for exploration and experimentation; because there is always the possibility of losing your work due to a software bug.

THE HEADER BAR

Starting with the initial Creative Cloud release several years ago, Adobe began the process of cleaning up the Premiere interface. Because, frankly, there were so many icons, controls and widgets it was almost impossible to figure out what you needed to tweak to accomplish even simple tasks.

The latest beta release continues that trend. Once you create a new project – or open an existing one – you’ll see a lot fewer icons at the top of the interface.

Adobe calls this the Header Bar and it now divides into two sections. On the left (at the top of the screen shot) are:

  • Home. This brings you back to the opening screen where you can choose which project to open or create.
  • Import. This opens a new approach to importing media and creating a new project.

NOTE: You can by-pass this window by clicking Create in the lower right corner.

  • Edit. This opens the editing window with the familiar Premiere interface.
  • Export. This opens a new approach to exporting projects.

NOTE: I’ll cover both import and export workflows in future tips.

On the right (lower portion of the screen shot) are icons to:

  • Quick Export. This expands on the Quick Export option in the current release version of Premiere.
  • New Features. This, not surprisingly, displays a “What’s New in Premiere” screen.
  • Feedback. This speeds sending feedback to Adobe during the beta process.
  • Workspaces. Rather than listing all workspaces across the top of the screen, they are now consolidated into this menu. Their function is the same, however.
  • Maximize video output. This displays video in the current timeline full screen.

Adobe concludes: “We’ll be rolling out these new experiences on a timeline starting with this public Beta to ensure that our customers can provide feedback, explore the changes and continue to use Premiere Pro to its fullest potential. These changes are additive and not a replacement to current workflows. We understand how important muscle-memory is and we don’t want to disrupt your flow in any way.”

Here’s a link to Adobe’s blog with more details on all the changes.


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Tip #1724: What Do These Icons Do?

Larry Jordan – LarryJordan.com

These six icons control how media files are displayed in the Project panel or bins.

These icons are located in the lower-left corner of the Premiere interface.

Topic $TipTopic

These six icons, tucked into the lower-left corner of the Premiere Pro interface, can help you better find and organize the media in your project. Here’s what they do, from left to right.

  • Green pen. This marks a project as writable. For solo editors, this will always be green. But, for team projects, a red pen indicates a project you can view, but not change.
  • Two stacked lines. This displays the contents of the Project panel or a bin as lines of text.
  • Blue square. This displays the contents of the Project panel or a bin as thumbnails.
  • Stacked rectangles. This displays the contents of the Project panel or a bin as “freeform thumbnails” you can resize and move around – like images on a light table. The purpose of this is to help you organize your media visually.
  • Open circle. This slider determines how large to display thumbnails. (Not available when media is displayed as a list.)
  • Three stacked lines. This determines the sort order for thumbnails. (This option is only available when thumbnails, not freeform images, are displayed.

NOTE: Sort order when a line list is displayed is determined by most recent column header you clicked.


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Tip #1722: The New Quick Export Menu

Larry Jordan – LarryJordan.com

Quick Export is designed to create H.264 files for the web.

The Quick Export panel (top) and the contents of the Preset menu (bottom).

Topic $TipTopic

One of the newer features in Adobe Premiere Pro is Quick Export. This is a one-click icon to quickly export a project for review or distribution via the web or social media.

  • In the top right corner of the Premiere interface is a “Send” icon (top red arrow).
  • Click it and the Quick Export panel pops up.
  • Click the menu (middle arrow) to reveal a variety of compression choices (bottom arrow). Select the option you want based upon the frame size of the exported file.

These options all create H.264 movies, suitable for posting to social media or websites.

You can see the specific compression settings at the bottom of this menu.

EXTRA CREDIT

This menu was designed to simplify exports for social media. As always, you can create custom settings and choose from a much wider variety of codecs using File > Export > Media.


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Tip #1723: How Much Faster?

Larry Jordan – LarryJordan.com

Adobe continues its focus on stability and performance with Premiere Pro.

H.264 encoding using Intel Quick Snyc (Windows). (L-R) Software-only, Premiere 14.0, 14.8 and 15.1.

Topic $TipTopic

Adobe recently improved the performance of H.264 encoding on Windows using Intel Quick Sync hardware acceleration.

The latest numbers show Premiere Pro 15.1 to be:

  • 77% faster than software encoding using H.264 with HD media.
  • 68% faster than software encoding using H.264 with UHD media.
  • 36% faster than Premiere 14.0 using H.264 with HD media.
  • 45% faster than Premiere 14.0 using H.264 with UHD media.

HEVC encoding showed similar speed gains.

EXTRA CREDIT

Premiere Pro 15.1 was released in April, 2021. The chart illustrates the specific results by version.


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Tip #1697: The Secrets in Clip Properties

Larry Jordan – LarryJordan.com

The Clip Properties displays tons of technical details about a clip.

The Clip Properties window in Premiere Pro.

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Most of the time, you don’t need to know all the technical details of the clips you are editing. But, when you do, Premiere has a hidden menu that can tell you a LOT!

To display it:

  • Control-click a clip in the Timeline, Project or Bin panel.
  • From the popup menu that appears, select Properties.
  • The Clip Properties window appears (see screen shot).

NOTE: The contents of this window will change, depending upon what type of clip is selected.

I enjoy exploring this window from time to time simply to admire how much technical data Premiere needs to track and process for each clip.

EXTRA CREDIT

The Data Rate Analysis window shows the file size of each frame in a video clip. Codecs that use variable bit rate encoding will vary in size per frame.


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Tip #1699: The Secret Nest Switch

Larry Jordan – LarryJordan.com

Edit sequences you don’t want to change as a single element.

This switch determines if a nest is added to the timeline as a single “clip,” or a group of clips.

Topic $TipTopic

Hidden in plain sight in the top left corner of the timeline is the “Nest Switch.”

A nest is a sequence contained in another sequence. There are a wide variety of uses:

  • Reusing an open between programs
  • Cleaning up a timeline
  • Preventing accidental changes to a completed section
  • And many others

An easy way to add one sequence into another is to drag it from the Project panel into the timeline.

NOTE: You can also use the traditional keyboard shortcuts of comma and period.

When the switch, indicated by the red arrow in the screen shot, is blue, the sequence edits into the timeline as a single element. This makes it harder to make changes to the contents of the sequence.

When the switch is white, the sequence is edited into the timeline as individual clips. This simplifies making changes.

EXTRA CREDIT

To see the contents of a nest, simply double-click it. That opens it into its own timeline for editing.


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Tip #1700: What the Linked Selection Button Does

Larry Jordan – LarryJordan.com

Most of the time, leaving Linked Selection on prevents surprises during editing.

Linked Selection on (blue): Top. Linked Selection off (white): Bottom

Topic $TipTopic

Normally, when you click a linked clip (where the audio and video are synced together), both are selected. But there’s a switch that can change that.

In the top left corner of the timeline (see screen shot) is the Linked Selection switch.

  • When this is blue (top image), clicking a synced audio/video clip selects the entire clip.
  • When this switch is white (bottom image), clicking a synced clip only selects that part of the clip you clicked on.

NOTE: This separation is useful when you want to delete the audio or video portion of a clip, or move the audio separately from the video.

EXTRA CREDIT

Toggling this switch does not change the selection state of any currently-selected clips.

You can temporarily achieve the same result by pressing the Option key when you click a clip. This performs the opposite of the current setting of this switch.


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Tip #1679: What is Adaptive Audio?

Larry Jordan – LarryJordan.com

Premiere provides flexibility in assigning audio formats and channels.

Audio channel format options inside Adobe Premiere.

Topic $TipTopic

Most of the time, Adobe Premiere Pro guesses the audio format and channel assignments correctly when you import a clip. But, sometimes, you need to make changes.

To do so:

  • Control-click the audio clip you want to adjust in the Project or Bin panel.
  • Select Modify > Audio Channels.
  • In the popup window, set Clip Channel Format to Mono, Stereo, 5.1 or Adaptive.
  • Finally, using the checkboxes at the bottom, you can remap which channel in the audio clip plays on which channel in Premiere.

One of the Format options is “Adaptive.” Adobe describes Adaptive as: “The adaptive track can contain mono, stereo, and adaptive clips. With adaptive tracks, you can map source audio to output audio channels in the way that works best for your workflow. This track type is useful for working with audio from cameras that record multiple audio tracks. Adaptive tracks can also be used when working with merged clips, or multicam sequences.”


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Tip #1680: The Option Makes the Difference

Larry Jordan – LarryJordan.com

The simplest shortcuts often make the biggest difference.

Press Option to click and select just one track in a linked clip.

Topic $TipTopic

Sometimes, the simplest shortcuts make the biggest difference. Here’s one option I can’t live without.

Normally, when you click a synced clip in the Timeline, the entire clip is selected. And, most of the time, that’s exactly what you want.

Sometimes, though, you want to select just the audio or just the video portion of a synced clip. Perhaps you want to delete it, or move it into sync, or apply an audio filter to one channel and not another.

You could click the Link Selection button at the top left of the Timeline, but, frankly, it’s just easier to press Option, then click the portion of the clip you want to select.

When Option is not pressed, clicking selects the entire clip. When Option is pressed, clicking selects only the track you click on.

I’ve used this trick for years – it has saved me countless hours because it’s so simple… and effective.


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