… for Apple Final Cut Pro X

Tip #1314: Delete Generated Media More Easily

Larry Jordan – LarryJordan.com

Generated media take storage space – which, sometimes, you need to get back.

This window allows you to select which generated media you want to delete.

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I discovered this tip while researching a recent PowerUP webinar covering the new features in Apple Final Cut Pro v. 10.5.

Generated media are files created by Final Cut to enable your editing. These files are based on your original camera media, serve a variety of purposes, and include:

  • Optimized files
  • Proxy files
  • Render files

The problem is that these files take a lot of space and, most of time, Final Cut does not erase them, just in case you need to use them again. Most of the time, Final Cut needs these for your projects. But, for projects you’ve been working on a while, the storage space required for this generated media can get out of hand.

New with the 10.5 update are more ways to get rid of it. We can now deleted generated media by:

  • Clip
  • Selected group of clips
  • Events
  • Selected group of events
  • Projects
  • Selected group of projects
  • Library

Once you’ve selected something, go to File > Delete Generated [ name of selection ] Media. In the resulting dialog (see screen shot) select the types of files you want to delete.

EXTRA CREDIT

Deleting generated media can not be undone. However, if you delete something that Final Cut needs, FCP will automatically regenerate it. So deleting generated medis is less risky than it seems.


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… for Apple Final Cut Pro X

Tip #1312: The Comparison Viewer Saves Time

Larry Jordan – LarryJordan.com

The Comparison Viewer is very helpful when doing color grading to match shots.

The Comparison Viewer (left) with buttons displayed on bottom.

Topic $TipTopic

I discovered this tip while researching a recent PowerUP webinar covering the new features in Apple Final Cut Pro v. 10.5.

The Comparison Viewer displays two timeline images side-by-side, which can simplify color grading or other tasks where comparing two images is helpful (see screen shot).

To display the Comparison Viewer, go to Window > Show in Workspace > Comparison Viewer (Shortcut: Control + Cmd + 6).

There are two buttons at the top:

  • Timeline. This displays the last frame of the previous clip, or the first frame of the following clip relative to the position of the playhead in the timeline. Switch between views using the Previous Edit / Next Edit buttons at the bottom.
  • Saved. This saves up to 30 still frames, captured at the position of the playhead in the timeline, then displays whichever you select in the Comparison Viewer.

I find using this very helpful whenever I do color grading.


… for Apple Motion

Tip #1303: Add a Curve to a Motion Path

Larry Jordan – LarryJordan.com

There are multiple ways to add curves to motion paths.

Double-click a motion path line, then drag to create a curve.

Topic $TipTopic

All motion paths in Motion are straight lines. However, adding a curve is easy. Here’s how.

PEN or PAINTBRUSH TOOL

  • When drawing a line with either the Pen or Paintbrush tool, drag when setting a corner. This changes the corner from a sharp edge to a curve.

MOTION PATH

  • Double-click anywhere on the red motion path line to set a control point.
  • Drag the control point to create a curve.
  • Drag one or both of the white control handles to change the shape of the curve.

A CONTROL POINT

  • Control-click an existing corner in a motion path line. From the popup menu, change it from Linear to Smooth to add a curve.
  • Change from Smooth to Linear to change a curve to a corner.

… for Apple Motion

Tip #1304: Secret 3D View Control

Larry Jordan – LarryJordan.com

This is a fast and interactive way to change the view in the Viewer.

Default 3D screen control (top). Roll over it to change to an expanded controller (bottom).

Topic $TipTopic

When you switch to 3D space in Motion, an innocuous control, illustrated at the top of the screen shot, appears.

I’ve happily ignored this for years.

But, if you hover your mouse over it, the control expands into a multi-purpose screen controller (bottom of screen shot).

  • Click one of the outside boxes to switch between Top, Bottom, Left, Right, or Back views.
  • Click the edge of the center box itself to switch to Perspective View.
  • Click the center of the box to switch to Front View.
  • Type Control + A to switch back to Active Camera view.

There are keyboard shortcuts for these, but clicking the controller creates a very cool effect.


… for Adobe Premiere Pro CC

Tip #1301: Enable High Quality Playback

Larry Jordan – LarryJordan.com

High-quality compensates for the visual difference when playing or pausing a clip.

Topic $TipTopic

Premiere allows control over playback quality and resolution. By default High Quality Playback is turned off. When should you turn it on?

Here’s the answer, from Adobe Help.

NOTE: Click the Wrench icon in either the Source or Program Monitors to see these menu options.

Playback vs. Paused Resolution

Some formats are difficult to display in full-motion playback, due to their high compression or high data rate. A lower resolution permits faster motion playback, but at the expense of display image quality. This tradeoff is most visible when viewing AVCHD and other H.264 -codec based media. Below full resolution, these formats have error correction turned off, and artifacts are common during playback. These artifacts, however, do not show up in exported media.

Providing separate playback and pause resolutions gives you more control over your monitoring experience. With high-resolution footage, you can set playback resolution to a lower value (for example, 1/4) for smooth playback, and set the pause resolution to Full. These settings allow you to check the quality of focus or edge details when playback is paused. Scrubbing puts the monitor in playback resolution, not pause resolution.

Not all resolutions are available for all sequence types. For Standard Definition sequences, such as DV, only Full and 1/2 are available. For many HD sequences up to 1080 frame size, Full, 1/2, and 1/4 are available. For sequences with frame sizes larger than 1080, such as RED, more fractional resolutions are available.

High Quality Playback

To optimize playback performance, playback quality at any of the monitor’s playback resolutions (Full, ½, and ¼) is lower than it is when pausing the video. Due to the difference in quality, users may notice a slight “bump” in image quality between playback and pause. Frames can have a slightly softer look during playback versus pause at the default settings, even when both are set to full resolution. With High-Quality Playback toggled on, the quality of playback frames will match paused frames when they’re set to the same resolution and eliminate the quality “bump” when starting and stopping playback. However, turning High-Quality Playback on can decrease playback performance, including causing dropped frames.

EXTRA CREDIT

For my projects, I set:

  • Playback resolution to 1/2
  • Paused Resolution to Full
  • And turn High Quality Playback off

When I get a newer/faster system, I’ll turn High Quality on.


… for Adobe Premiere Pro CC

Tip #1302: Surprising Preview Resolutions

Larry Jordan – LarryJordan.com

Be careful – preview files may not match your source file resolution.

Topic $TipTopic

Render file resolution can vary, depending upon two hidden settings. Here’s what you need to know to avoid problems.

According to the Help files for Adobe Premiere:

If your previews are rendered at a resolution below the sequence resolution, the playback resolution is actually a fraction of the preview resolution.

For example, you can set your preview files to render at 1/2 the sequence frame size (1/2 resolution) and your playback resolution to 1/2 resolution. The rendered previews play back at 1/4 of original resolution (assuming that the resolution of the original media matched the sequence resolution).

NOTE: You can set keyboard shortcuts to change the playback resolution.

Not all resolutions are available for all sequence types. For Standard Definition sequences, such as DV, only Full and 1/2 are available. For many HD sequences up to 1080 frame size, Full, 1/2, and 1/4 are available. For sequences with frame sizes larger than 1080, such as RED, more fractional resolutions are available.

EXTRA CREDIT

This possible resolution difference is why I never use existing preview files when exporting. I always want to be sure exports are at the highest resolution.

Here’s the link to Adobe’s Help for more information.


… for Apple Final Cut Pro X

Tip #1298: Shortcuts to Move Clips

Larry Jordan – LarryJordan.com

I use these tips all the time when I need to tweak a clip into better position.

Select a connected clip, then type comma or period to move it left or right.

Topic $TipTopic

While clips in the Primary Storyline are magnetically “connected” to each other, that is not true for any connected clip. Here’s a quick tip that allows you to move connected clips or storylines using only the keyboard.

  • Select the connected clip(s) you want to move.
  • Type comma to move the selected clips left one frame.
  • Type Shift + comma to move the selected clips left ten frames.
  • Type period to move the selected clips right one frame.
  • Type Shift + period to move the selected clips right ten frames.

NOTE: This keyboard shortcut won’t work on clips in the Primary Storyline.

EXTRA CREDIT

This same keyboard shortcut also works for selected edit points.


… for Adobe Premiere Pro CC

Tip #1278: Jump in Time

Larry Jordan – LarryJordan.com

Typing in timecode is often faster and more precise than dragging the playhead.

Click and enter either absolute or relative timecode values.

Topic $TipTopic

Here’s a quick tip to help you move around Premiere’s timeline more easily.

Double-click the timecode display in the top left corner of the timeline, then enter the timecode position where you want to move the playhead.

NOTE: Unlike earlier versions of Premiere, you only need to enter digits, not punctuation.

  • To jump to an absolute timecode reference, enter the full number (i.e. 00001000 in the screen shot).
  • To jump a relative distance to the right, enter the amount you want to move as a positive number (i.e. +25 jumps 25 frames forward).
  • To jump a relative distance to the left, enter the amount you want to move as a negative number (i.e. -215 jumps 2 seconds, 15 frames back).

NOTE: If you enter 75, Premiere will automatically calculate the number of seconds and frames to move the playhead based on the frame rate of the sequence.

EXTRA CREDIT

In the timecode display, a semi-colon before the frame number indicates drop-frame timecode. All colons means non-drop frame timecode.


… for Adobe Premiere Pro CC

Tip #1279: Marker Tips & Tricks

Larry Jordan – LarryJordan.com

Markers are perfect for navigation, or just leaving yourself a note.

The Edit Marker dialog box.

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Markers do so much in Premiere, it is hard to list all the options. But here are some of my favorites:

  • Markers are always placed at the position of the playhead.
  • You can add markers in the Source Monitor or Program Monitor
  • If a clip is selected, markers are added to the clip. If not, they are added to the timeline.
  • Markers can be dragged into a new position.
  • Double-click a marker to open it for editing.
  • Markers can have titles, descriptions/transcripts and/or colors.
  • Comment markers can be exported and added to QuickTime and MP4 movies.
  • The Markers panel displays all sequence markers and enables jumping between them.

EXTRA CREDIT

  • To set a marker, type M
  • To delete a marker, put the playhead at the marker position and type Option + M
  • To delete all markers, type Option + Cmd + M
  • To jump the playhead to the next marker, type Shift + M
  • To jump to a previous marker, type Shift + Cmd + M

… for Adobe Premiere Pro CC

Tip #1280: Quick Project Panel Tricks

Larry Jordan – LarryJordan.com

List view is similar to a spreadsheet – with the addition of dozens of hidden columns.

Drag and resize columns in List View just like a spreadsheet.

Topic $TipTopic

When you switch to List view in the Program panel, clips and sequences are sorted into rows and columns. This gives you lots of different ways to look at the elements of your project.

List View is similar to a spreadsheet:

  • Drag the name of a column header to move it to a new location.
  • Drag the vertical line between column headers to resize the column.
  • Click the column header to sort by that column.
  • Click twice to sort in descending order
  • Shift-click a second column header to sort on a second column (for example, click first on Scene to sort by Scene number, then, shift-click on Log Note to sort by circled takes.)

NOTE: The Name column can not be moved.

To hide or display more columns, Control-click any column EXCEPT the Name column and choose Metadata Display.

While you can display any metadata fields listed there, the one that will be most helpful are the fields inside Premiere Pro Project Metadata.