… for Apple Final Cut Pro X

Tip #1493: How to Create a Split Edit

Larry Jordan – LarryJordan.com

Split edits solve many editing problems.

An example of a split edit, where audio and video edit at different times.

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(I discovered this tip while researching a recent PowerUP webinar presenting Audio in Apple Final Cut Pro.)

A split edit is where the audio and video edit at different places in the timeline. It is a workhorse in editing, where you want to linger on the video while hearing different audio (see screen shot). Or vice-versa.

To create a split edit:

  • Double-click the audio portion of a clip in the Final Cut timeline (Shortcut: Control +S). This separates it from the video without unlinking it.
  • Select the Trim tool (Shortcut: T) from the Tools menu.
  • Click and drag the audio edit point to a new location. The audio edit point moves, without altering the video. (This type of edit is called a “Roll” trim.)

NOTE: You can do the same with the video edit point. Click and drag with the Trim tool.

EXTRA CREDIT

You can move the selected edit point multiple ways:

  • Type Control + [comma] / [period] to move left/right one frame.
  • Type Shift + Control + [comma] / [period] to move left/right ten frames
  • Type Shift + X to jump the edit point to the position of the playhead (assuming you have sufficient handles and are not jumping over other clips).

To remove a split edit, select the clip and choose Trim > Align Audio to Video. This trims (not moves) the audio to match the timing of the video for that clip.


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2 Comments
  1. Brian Galford
    Brian Galford says:

    “Select the Trim tool (Shortcut: T) from the Tools menu.
    Click and drag the audio edit point to a new location. The audio edit point moves, without altering the video.”
    But wait,
    You can’t roll the audio portion of an edit which involves sync sound coming out of a character’s lips without ruining the sync. it might be better to roll the VIDEO of the previous video edit or the next shot while leaving the audio sync alone.

    Reply
    • Larry Jordan
      Larry Jordan says:

      Brian:

      There are many times where I will roll the audio, rather than the video – perhaps to hear a breath over the original speaker else turning to look. There are other reasons I can think of.

      The nice thing is that, when the audio is open like this, you have the option of rolling either video or audio.

      Larry

      Reply

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