… for Random Weirdness

Tip #1756: Tips for Keeping a Camera Cool

Larry Jordan – LarryJordan.com

Hot cameras are noisy. Here’s how to keep yours cool.

Image detail courtesy of Pexels.com.

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This article, written by Lewis McGregor, first appeared in PremiumBeat.com. This is a summary.

Since the introduction of the RED ONE MX, camera cooling has continued to improve. However, because camera cooling has improved doesn’t mean modern cameras aren’t prone to overheating. Additionally, even when cameras can keep themselves cool, it’s usually at the cost of fans being ramped up to an audible level.

Here are a few methods to keep your camera cool on a hot summer’s day.

  • Gel Packs. Running straight from what I used with my RED ONE, gel packs are still handy to lower the temperature of a camera. You can pick up gel packs (usually a set of two) for around $10. While a gel pack will stay cold for at least one to two hours when pressed against the skin, you can expect this to be considerably less when used against a hot camera.
  • Ice Packs. Due to their size and weight, they aren’t ideal for placing on top of a camera. And, given they’re filled with tap water then frozen, it’s not something that you want near your camera to begin with.
  • Courtesy Flags and Other Shade Tools. While it sounds majestic, a courtesy flag is nothing more than a regular grip flag. However, this isn’t intended to be used to shape light or negative fill. Instead, it’s used to create shade for the crew who cannot move into the shade while working. You can also get a flag setup to keep the camera out of line for direct sunlight.
  • White Shoulder Case. Larger and heavier lenses are commonly painted white by the manufacturer to reflect sunlight to keep the lens cool. Using that methodology, some case and bag manufacturers—such as Porta Brace—have created white shoulder cases.
  • Pop-up Canopy Tent. These are portable tents that can be set up within minutes. And, while they may initially look costly, you can pick up the smaller models, as seen in the image below, for less than $50.

EXTRA CREDIT

This article has more details, illustrations and links to more tips to keeping your gear cool and in working order.


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