… for Apple Final Cut Pro X

Tip #1694: What Does “Analyze & Fix” Do?

Larry Jordan – LarryJordan.com

These automated features help find and fix problem clips.

The Final Cut Analyze and Fix dialog box, with audio fixes enabled.

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Final Cut provides an option – Analyze and Fix – that will review clips either during or after import to find and, potentially fix, any problems with the clip.

This process runs in the background and can be monitored in the Background Tasks window (Shortcut: Cmd + 9)

If you want to check clips after they are imported, simply select the clips you want to check in the Browser and choose File > Analyze and Fix.

VIDEO OPTIONS

Here’s what the options mean (according to Apple’s Help files):

Balance Color: Analyzes video clips to detect color balance and contrast. Color is automatically balanced when you add the clip to the timeline. You can turn automatic color adjustments on and off at any time using the Video Inspector.

Find People: Analyzes video clips and still images for the number of people present and shot types. After analysis, any of the following keywords are added to the clips or clip ranges: One Person, Two Persons, Group, Close Up Shot, Medium Shot, and Wide Shot.

Consolidate find people results: Consolidates all of the “find people” analysis keywords into one shot type keyword and one people keyword for every 2-minute segment of video. The shot type keyword chosen is the one for the widest shot type, and the people keyword chosen is the one representing the most people. For example, if a video segment contains Medium Shot, Wide Shot, One Person, and Group keywords, the segment’s analysis keywords are reduced to Wide Shot and Group during consolidation.

Create Smart Collections after analysis: Creates a Smart Collection for each keyword applied when video clips and still images are analyzed for the presence of people. The Smart Collections are listed alphabetically in a People folder inside the event in the Libraries sidebar.

AUDIO OPTIONS

Analyze and fix audio problems: Analyzes the audio for hum, noise, and loudness. Final Cut Pro automatically fixes problems that are considered severe (marked in red) and flags problems that are considered moderate (marked in yellow). See Enhance audio in Final Cut Pro.

Separate mono and group stereo audio: Audio channels are analyzed and grouped as dual mono or stereo, depending on the results of the analysis. Automatically corrected audio channels are marked as Autoselected. For more information about audio channels, see Configure audio channels in Final Cut Pro.

Remove silent channels: Audio channels are analyzed, and silent channels are removed. Clips that have had channels removed are marked as Autoselected. For more information about audio channels, see Configure audio channels in Final Cut Pro.

EXTRA CREDIT

Personally, i don’t like the results of video analysis, so I always turn these off. However, I do like the results of audio analysis so I always turn these on.


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… for Visual Effects

Tip #1636: New Demos at Toolfarm

Larry Jordan – LarryJordan.com

8 new/updated tutorials – all free.

Image courtesy of Toolfarm.com.

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Toolfarm has added or updated 8 demos to their ever growing collection of free trials. The demos give you chance to take a plug-in for a spin and kick the tires, so you can get a feel for how it works, and if it works with your system.

Here’s the list:

  • Chris Vranos Lockdown
  • Digital Anarchy
    • Flicker Free
    • Beauty Box
  • FabFilter Timeless 3
  • Blace
    • AI Face Detection & Blurring
    • Goodbye Greenscreen
  • Crunchy Cloners + Effectors
  • Will Cecil Pixel Encoder

Toolfarm Link.


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… for Codecs & Media

Tip #1604: SoftRAID Now Compatible with M1 Macs

Larry Jordan – LarryJordan.com

Be sure to upgrade to macOS 11.3 for SoftRAID to work.

The SoftRAID logo.

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Due to significant changes in file handling with Big Sur and M1 Macs, it took at while for OWC SoftRAID to become compatible.

Then, with Big Sur 11.2, Apple broke that compatibility, again, with file changes that affected M1 Macs.

SoftRAID just announced that Big Sur 11.3 now allows SoftRAID to work with both Big Sur and M1 Macs.

Here’s a blog post from Tim Standing, head of the SoftRAID team at OWC with the details.


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… for Visual Effects

Tip #1595: Re:Vision Effects Goes Beta for M1 Mac

Larry Jordan – LarryJordan.com

Re-Vision Effects now offers betas versions for M1 Macs

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Re:Vision Effects sent an update email late last week:

We’re in the process of updating the current versions of our plug-ins for M1 support. Sorry, but older versions can’t be retrofitted so you will need to upgrade.

All of our product for OpenFX are now available with an M1 version. The installer will now detect the machine type and you will have an option to install M1, Intel or both. These have been tested in the Resolve 17 M1 build and should work with other OpenFX hosts (e.g. Nuke, Scratch,…) as they release M1 builds.

We’ve released Twixtor regular as FxPlug 4 for M1 and labeled the release M1 beta. On an Intel machine you will still use the old plug-ins. Bonus: more support for Motion with Twixtor is coming soon, we’ll announce when the update is ready.

For more information, visit: www.revisionfx.com


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… for Visual Effects

Tip #1600: What Effects Software Runs on M1 Macs?

Larry Jordan – LarryJordan.com

M1 compatibility is still “a work in progress.”

Image courtesy of Toolfarm.com.

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Toolfarm has published and recently updated a list of effects titles and their compatibility with M1 Macs. This list of over 100 applications includes those with both Rosetta and native compatibility.

Here’s the link.


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… for Random Weirdness

Tip #1583: The Basics of Live Multi-cam Streaming

Larry Jordan – LarryJordan.com

This video focuses more on digitizing and streaming.

Host, John Hess.

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Filmmaker IQ created a 25 minute video describing “The Basics of Setting Up a Multi-camera Live Stream.” Hosted by John Hess.

It’s a rundown of all the elements you have to plan and pull together to create a successful multi-camera live stream, with a focus on the capture card and digitizing the image.

Here’s the link


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… for Visual Effects

Tip #1579: Understanding ACES for Color

Larry Jordan – LarryJordan.com

ACES is designed to be the industry standard for color.

The ACES logo.

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This article, written by Jourdan Aldredge, first appeared in NoFilmSchool.com. This is a summary.

The Academy Color Encoding System (ACES) is designed to be the industry standard for color. This series will help explain what it is and how to use it in DaVinci Resolve.

ACES is a color management framework for motion images. This means that it offers a standardized way to transform what our camera saw into what our display can reproduce.

Just like our eyes, cameras and displays encode color as a proportion of pure red, green, and blue. But “pure” means one thing to our vision system, and another to any particular camera or display. This is why we need color spaces.

And this is where ACES comes in—it offers a user-friendly system for performing these transformations, allowing us to objectively transform our image from its capture color space into the color space of the display we’re mastering. This process is known as color management, and it’s the foundation of all effective image mastering.

EXTRA CREDIT

As well, the NoFilmSchool article is the start of a multi-part series explaining ACES and includes a video explaining ACES and DaVinci Resolve.

The video is worth watching and run less than 12 minutes.


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… for Visual Effects

Tip #1581: Bring the HEAVY Weapons to “Monster Hunter:

Larry Jordan – LarryJordan.com

If the creatures are going to be CGI, make everything else real.

Milla Jovovich and Tony Jaa had to perform with the signature oversized weapons from the video game.

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This article, written by Trevor Hogg, first appeared in VFXVoice.com.

This in-depth article explores how the VFX team responsible for creating Monster Hunter, which is based on a video game. This is a summary.

Director Paul Anderson said: “My approach on this movie was if the creatures have to be CG, let’s shoot on real landscapes rather than in studio backlots against a greenscreen. Every time a creature’s foot goes down on the ground it displaces and showers our actors with real sand, and the lens flare from the sun will be real as well as the wind. It gives the animators an awful lot to match into as well as helps to tie the creatures into the reality of the existing location.”

The cinematic versions of the monsters are not exact replicas. “With the monsters you’re building them at a different level of detail than a video game engine could ever handle,” says Anderson. “Dennis Berardi [The Shape of Water], our Visual Effects Supervisor and co-producer, and his team sat down and analyzed the way that the creatures moved in the game and compared that to creatures of a similar bulk in our world [such as elephants and rhinoceroses] and how they would move with gravity operating on them. A footfall of a creature weighing a certain amount must displace a certain amount of sand or whatever material it’s running on. Something of a certain size normally moves at certain speed.”

Sixty-five minutes of screen time consist of 1,300 visual effects shots created by MR. X facilities in Toronto, Montreal and Bangalore, as well as at South African-based BlackGinger. “We had one situation where Kaname Fujioka [the director of the Monster Hunter games] and the team at Capcom were like, ‘Diablos looks amazing, but her toenails are too sharp,’” recalls MR. X Visual Effects Supervisor Trey Harrell. “Diablos is an herbivore, so the feature should be more like a rhino or elephant with rounded tusks with no pointy sharp bits. The most interesting thing to me that I found over the course of this whole journey was there is a certain amount of hubris involved when you start on a property and go, ‘Now we’re making a movie version of this.’ But a lot of times you do that before you understand the design in the first place. Everything was there for a purpose.”

EXTRA CREDIT

Trevor’s interview contains far more detail, almost two dozen production stills, and links to other in-depth interviews.


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… for Codecs & Media

Tip #1585: Canon Utility Converts Cameras to Webcams

Larry Jordan – LarryJordan.com

Webcams are in short-supply. Canon has an answer.

Alejandro Medellin’s webcam studio with Canon camera on the right.

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This article, written by Alejandro Medellin, first appeared in PremiumBeat.com.

Webcams these days are in short supply. Fortunately, last year, Canon released the EOS Webcam Utility, Canon’s answer to the ongoing webcam shortage. It’s really, really easy to set up, and the picture quality is top notch.

The webcam utility turns several Canon cameras into legitimate webcams. (22 EOS cameras and 3 Powershots). The utility was good, the battery life of the cameras wasn’t.

So, Canon just released the new Webcam Accessories Starter Kit. This kit comes in three variations that each serve a line of Canon cameras. Each kit comes with an interface cable, a power adapter, and a dummy battery. The camera can stay on for hours with the dummy battery, which draws its power from an electrical outlet via the power adapter. The interface cable connects the camera to the computer via the USB port, which the webcam software then converts into a clean video input.

Though Canon’s accessory kit would have made a more significant impact last year at the height of the pandemic, it’s still a welcome product. The kit puts the hardware on par with the webcam software, and that’s all I needed. With demand still for webcams, the accessories kit is highly sought after.

EXTRA CREDIT

The article includes a list of all supported Canon cameras, details on configuring the software, and a review on how easy it is to use and how well it works.


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… for Random Weirdness

Tip #1524: The IP Video Revolution in Here

Larry Jordan – LarryJordan.com

The second video revolution is here: IP.

The Primestream logo.

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The evolution from baseband to IP turned into a revolution in 2020 for the broadcast and streaming industries as the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic forced operations to double down on remote production workflows and technologies. Video technology companies and producers have turned to IP-based production like never before, embracing its efficiency, flexibility, and ability to meet rapidly changing requirements cost-effectively.

PrimeStream just released a new white-paper: “The IP Broadcast Revolution” that discusses this transition. The white paper takes a closer look at this massive paradigm shift. We trace the IP revolution from RF and baseband to IP, from satellite and microwave antennas to SIM cards, and from the broadcast operations center to the cloud. From there, we introduce the Primestream IP Broadcast Network Operation Center™ (NOC), which is enabling the future of video workflows through powerful solutions such as Media IO and Xchange™ Media Cloud.

The white paper is only 7 pages long, profusely illustrated and easy to read.

White paper link.


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