… for Adobe Premiere Pro CC

Tip #022: 2 Export Options You Don’t Need

Larry Jordan – https://LarryJordan.com

These options have been puzzling editors for years.

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You are ready to export your final project, when you come face-to-face with two inscrutable checkboxes. Ever wonder how to set these options in the Export window of Premiere? We’ve got the answer.

  • Maximum Bit Depth. If you have a GPU, Maximum Bit Depth is irrelevant as you’re already getting that performance from the GPU, if it is applicable to your media. Turn this off.
  • Maximum Render Quality. If you have a GPU, this, too can be turned off. The only reason to turn it on is if you are scaling your images – up or down – and see jagged edges on clearly defined diagonal lines. As of this time, scaling is still CPU-based, and only effects calculated using the CPU are affected by this setting.

Now you know.

As you can probably guess, as Adobe migrates from CPU-based effects to GPU-based effects both of these options will become unnecessary and probably disappear.


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… for Adobe Premiere Pro CC

Tip #122: What is Auto Save Actually Saving?

Larry Jordan – https://LarryJordan.com

Auto Save can protect you from catastrophe.

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By default, Auto Save saves a copy of your Project file every 15 minutes in the same location as your project.

NOTE: You can change the Auto Save location in Project Settings > Scratch Disks.

However, by default, Auto Save does NOT save your current project or media. Think of Auto Save as a backup file in case something really bad happens to your main project file. As well, if you don’t make any changes to your project for 15 minutes, it does not create a new Auto Save file.

Also, by default, it saves up to 20 versions. When it saves the 21st version, the oldest version is deleted. This means that it only keeps the 20 most recent versions of your project file to avoid filling your hard disk with backups.

You can have Premiere automatically save the project you are working on by checking the Auto Save also saves the current project(s) checkbox in Preferences > Auto Save.

I tend to leave this option off because I want to decide when to save my project – in case I’m experimenting and don’t want all those changes saved… yet.

But, automatically saving a project file can decrease your stress if you are someone who tends to forget to save frequenty.

Also, if you have a fast enough Internet connection, you can backup your project files, but NOT your media, to the Creative Cloud. My Internet connection is far to slow to make this viable.


… for Adobe Premiere Pro CC

Tip #133: Open Sequences Between Projects

Larry Jordan – https://LarryJordan.com

Premiere supports opening unlimited sequences from any project!

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Premiere allows you to open (more accurately, “import””) one or more sequences from different projects. This makes it easy to share work between projects. Here’s how:

  • Open, or create, the project into which you want to import a sequence.
  • Open the Media Browser.
  • Navigate to the project file that contains the sequence you want to open. Then, double-click it.
  • A message appears saying that Premiere is starting the Dynamic Link database. This technology allows different Adobe apps to share data between apps.
  • After a few more seconds, all the sequences, bins and clips in that project are displayed in the Media Browser.
  • Right-click the sequence you want and choose Import.

Virtually instantly, this project will appear in the Program panel.

NOTE: This simply imports a sequence, it doesn’t link them. Any changes you make are not reflected back to the original project.


… for Apple Final Cut Pro X

Tip #103: Add an Audio Fade Without Using Keyframes

Larry Jordan – https://LarryJordan.com

This is a fast way to add fades.

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In the Timeline, select an audio clip. Then, look very carefully at the edges.

Just above the volume control line you’ll see a small dot at each edge. This is the Audio Fade dot.

Drag the Dot to add a fade to the beginning or end of each clip.

To change the duration of the fade, simply slide the position of the dot left or right.


… for Random Weirdness

Tip #098: What’s the Best Way to Repair the Boot Disk?

Larry Jordan – https://LarryJordan.com

Not all repairs work the same – this is better.

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A common question is whether it really makes a difference to switch to Recovery mode to repair a hard disk. There are two answers:

  • No, if it is an external disk
  • Yes, if it’s the boot disk

WHY?

While we can repair an external drive at any time, we really can’t repair the boot disk when it is running AS the boot disk. By definition, all the OS files need to be open and active and we can’t repair an open, running file. Disk Utility compensates for this, but it can’t do a complete repair.

By launching into Recovery mode, we are booting from a completely different part of the hard drive, using totally different files. This allows Disk Utility to fully repair everything on the main boot disk – Macintosh HD – without interference.

EXTRA CREDIT

To launch into Recovery Mode, restart your Mac while pressing Cmd + R. Startup will take longer, but, when complete, you’ll be able to run First Aid from Disk Utility. I try to do this once a month or so.


… for Adobe Premiere Pro CC

Tip #007: Magic Markers

Larry Jordan – https://LarryJordan.com

Five Marker Tricks That Help You Get Organized

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To add a marker, position the playhead in the timeline where you want to locate a marker and type M. This adds a Cue marker at the position of the playhead.

  • Shift + M jumps the playhead to the next marker
  • Shift + Cmd + M (Windows: Shift + Cntrl + M) jumps the playhead to the previous marker.
  • Option + M deletes the selected marker.

To convert a marker to a range marker, double-click the marker icon, then give it a duration.

Once you create a marker press – / [forward slash] – this selects the marker name in the Marker panel so you can quickly rename the marker. If the Marker panel is not open, press – / – twice.

EXTRA CREDIT

The default marker name can be changed in Preferences > Markers & Metadata


… for Adobe Premiere Pro CC

Tip #041: Optimizing Premiere Transition Preferences

Larry Jordan – https://LarryJordan.com

Premiere’s defaults aren’t bad. But they aren’t very good, either.

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Preferences are exactly that – YOUR preferences on how the software should work. This means that you can set your preferences however you want. But, as a starting point to your own modifications, let me share some of my preferences with you. Use or modify these in whatever ways seem good to you.

Preferences > Timeline

The hidden “gotcha” with the transition settings are that they use frames to determine durations. Which is fine – until your frame rates change. At which point, all these durations need to change as well.

  • Video. I prefer transitional dissolves that last 2/3 of a second; a one-second transition just hangs on screen for too long. However, I also shoot mostly 60 fps material. So I change this to 40 frames (40/60 = 2/3).
  • Audio Transition. Most of the time, I like a 1/4 second fade-up, while for fade-outs, I prefer about one second.  Sadly, Premiere only allows me to pick one so I generally leave this at the default.
  • Still image. Here’s a cool tip. If you are building a still image montage set to music, figure out the duration between beats, then import all your stills to match that duration. This means you can edit stills into the timeline without setting an In or an Out.
  • Timeline Playback Auto-Scrolling. It takes more CPU power, but Smooth Scroll looks nicer. Use Page Scroll on slower systems, as it uses less CPU overhead.
  • Timeline mouse scrolling. Vertical allows you to quickly scroll up in projects that use many stacked clips. Most of my edits are five tracks or less, so I change this to Horizontal, so I can quickly move around the timeline.

… for Adobe Premiere Pro CC

Tip #094: Premiere and ProRes

Larry Jordan – https://LarryJordan.com

Premiere now supports ProRes

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If you are looking for a good intermediate codec to transcode highly-compressed media (such as H.264, AVCHD, or HEVC) into something easier to edit, Premiere now supports all flavors of ProRes on both Mac and Windows.

The first version of Premiere to support ProRes on Windows was 13.02. (ProRes on the Mac has been supported for a long time.) And the latest release of Premiere (Fall, 2019) has improved ProRes handling on both Mac and Windows.


… for Apple Final Cut Pro X

Tip #074: Automatic Keywords Using Finder Tags

Larry Jordan – https://LarryJordan.com

A Fast Way to Organize Media Before You Import

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Finder tags are the next step beyond changing the color of a file or folder: They allow a greater amount of customization and can be used, when importing media into Final Cut Pro, to create keywords automatically.

Right-click (Control-click) any file in the Finder and choose Tags.

The Finder ships with seven color tags. You can use these or create your own; for example, Interviews, B-roll, Scene 23, etc.).

Once a tag has been created, you can assign it to as many other clips as you want. Tags allow you to organize clips using the Finder before importing them into Final Cut.

In the Finder you can find files using tags. In Final Cut, when you import a file and select From Finder Tags in the Media Import window, FCP X will assign a keyword to match each Finder tag. These, then, work the same as any other keyword.

Think of it as automatic file organization.

Cool.


… for Adobe Premiere Pro CC

Tip #114: Optimize Your Content with Auto-Frame

Larry Jordan – https://LarryJordan.com

New Feature in Fall 2019 Release

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New in the Fall, 2019, release of Adobe Premiere, Auto Reframe “can be applied to individual clips as an effect or to whole sequences. Auto Reframe identifies the action in your video to ensure that what’s important stays within the output frame. When you are applying Auto Reframe, you can adjust the sensitivity of the algorithm, depending on the amount of motion within your footage. You can further refine the results by adjusting the keyframes after Auto Reframe has worked its magic.” (Adobe blog)

We’ll have more on this feature in coming weeks.