… for Adobe Premiere Pro CC

Tip #1003: The Slide Tool – Relic of the Past

Larry Jordan – LarryJordan.com

The Slip tool is essential. The Slide tool is a relic of the distant past.

The Slide tool moving the position of a clip, without changing content or duration.

Topic $TipTopic

Last week, I wrote about the Slip tool (Tip #986). Loren took me to task asking why I didn’t write about its cousin: the Slide tool. So, now, I am.

The Slip tool (Shortcut: Y) changes the content of a shot without changing its duration or location in the timeline.

The Slide tool (Shortcut: U) changes the position of a clip inside it’s track in the timeline, without changing its content or duration. It does this by trimming the Out of the clip before it and the In of the clip after it as you drag it in the Timeline.

The Slide tool was invented back in the earliest days of non-linear editing, when we only had one video track and one title track to work with. The Slide tool allowed us to slide clips along that single video track to find the best place to put a shot.

EXTRA CREDIT

You can only Slide a clip as far as you have handles on the clips before and after it.

While I use the Slip tool all the time, I never use the Slide tool anymore, simply because it is easier to raise a clip to a higher track where I can move it as much as I want without altering the clips on the main track.


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… for Apple Motion

Tip #990: Add Reflective Paint to 3D Text

Larry Jordan – LarryJordan.com

3D text provides almost unlimited design options for customizing text to fit our story.

Distressed 3D text, with a reflective pink paint applied. A blue spotlight was added to highlight the texture.

Topic $TipTopic

As I was playing with distressing 3D text (Tip #989) I discovered another setting: Reflective Paint. Even if you never create your own lights – and especially if you do – adding sheen to the surface of 3D text can make it “pop” more effectively.

To apply different paint surfaces to your text:

  • Create a 3D text clip.
  • Select Inspector > Text and scroll down until you see the Material section.
  • Below the Material section, select Options:Basic > Add Layer > Paint.
  • From the Paint menu, choose a surface that appeals to you.
  • In the settings for that surface option, select different looks from the Type menu. Drag sliders and watch what happens.

EXTRA CREDIT

In the screen shot, I applied a pink reflective paint, then added a deep blue spotlight from the side to highlight the texture of the text.


… for Adobe Premiere Pro CC

Tip #985: Hidden Sort Options

Larry Jordan – LarryJordan.com

Thumbnails can be sorted in far more than simple file name order.

The thumbnail sort options in the project panel.

Topic $TipTopic

Hidden in the Project panel is a wealth of sort options for all the elements in the Project panel or a bin. Here’s how to access them.

  • Open the Project panel.
  • Switch to thumbnail view.
  • To the right of the slider that determines thumbnail size, is an icon of three stacked lines with a down arrow. Click it.

From this menu, you can sort thumbnails on over 30 criteria.

EXTRA CREDIT

For you list junkies, the default sort is alphabetically on file name. However:

  • To sort on any column, click the column header.
  • To sort in reverse order, click the column header again.

… for Apple Final Cut Pro X

Tip #980: Final Cut Adds Custom Overlays

Larry Jordan – LarryJordan.com

Overlays provide custom framing display options.

A Viewer image with an overlay showing 16:9, 4:3 and 1:1 grids.

Topic $TipTopic

A new feature in the 10.4.9 update to Final Cut Pro X is custom overlays. These are PNG or TIFF graphics that can be superimposed on clips in the Viewer to help frame shots – especially for different aspect ratios.

In Photoshop, or the graphics app of your choice, create the image you want to import. While you can use any graphic, I recommend using a grid, because this will be placed over all Viewer images. Make sure the background is transparent, because, again, this will be supered over other images.

Save the image in a location you can find later.

  • Open Final Cut and go to the View menu in the top right corner of the Viewer.
  • Choose Custom Overlay > Add Custom Overlay and select the image you just created.
  • From the same menu, choose Show Custom Overlay and choose the transparency percentage you want to use.

NOTE: In the screen shot, the white grids indicate framing for 16:9, 4:3 and 1:1. Transparency is set to 75%.

Overlays can be anything you want. Keep in mind, however, that these won’t output. If you need to include them in your project the images need to be in the timeline.

EXTRA CREDIT

To turn off the overlays, uncheck Show Custom Overlays.


… for Apple Final Cut Pro X

Tip #981: Discover the Hidden Comparison Viewer

Larry Jordan – LarryJordan.com

Comparison view displays the In of the previous or next clip.

Comparison View (left) with arrows pointing to Previous / Next edits.

Topic $TipTopic

Hidden in an unusual place inside Final Cut Pro X is Comparison Viewer. This can make effects like color matching a whole lot easier.

Unlike most other interface options, display the Comparison View from Window > Show in Workspace > Comparison Viewer (Shortcut: Cntrl + Cmd + 6) .

This displays a window to the left of the Viewer that, by default, shows the In of the clip just before the clip the playhead/skimmer is in.

Click Previous Edit / Next Edit (red arrows in the screen shot) to jump between clips in this display.

NOTE: You can’t play clips in the Comparison Viewer, just view the frame at the In.

Click Saved at the top, then Save Frame at the bottom to capture the current frame under the playhead. Now, when you click Timeline, you view previous or next clips, then compare those to the frame saved as part of the Save option.

EXTRA CREDIT

The Comparison Viewer has the same display options as the Viewer. Go to the View menu to see different ways of displaying an image.


… for Apple Motion

Tip #963: Apple Updates Motion

Larry Jordan – LarryJordan.com

Apple updates Motion to support 3D shapes and a faster way to creates borders.

The 3D Transform tool adjusting on of the new 3D models in Motion 5.4.9.

Topic $TipTopic

Last week, Apple continued the evolutionary growth of Motion – to version 5.4.6 – along with updates for Final Cut Pro X and Compressor. While none of these features are revolutionary, all are useful and include:

  • Support for 3D models, along with 60 new 3D models in the Motion Library
  • Importing 3D models in the USDZ format.
  • A new Stroke filter which quickly outlines objects using an associated alpha channel

These free updates are accessed through the Mac App Store.

EXTRA CREDIT

The 5.4.4 release of Motion also included:

  • Metal-based processing engine to improve playback, rendering, and compositing.
  • Creating 8K motion graphics by harnessing the power of multiple GPUs, up to 28 CPU cores, and Afterburner with Mac Pro (2019).
  • Ability to view stunning HDR titles and effects with Apple Pro Display XDR.

Here’s a link to learn more.


… for Adobe Premiere Pro CC

Tip #972: A Second Secret Marker Tip

Larry Jordan – LarryJordan.com

Unchecking this option locks timeline markers in place, regardless what you do with your clips.

The Ripple Sequence Markers menu option. (I removed the middle of this menu.)

Topic $TipTopic

There’s another marker secret hidden in plain sight in the Markers menu.

Ripple Sequence Markers, which is on by default, means that when you delete a clip, insert a clip, close a gap or trim a clip, if there are timeline markers above the clip you just changed, the markers will be adjusted as well.

In early versions of Premiere, timeline markers were locked into position, regardless of what you did with your clips.

Now, if you find your markers changing position when you don’t want them to, go to the Markers menu and uncheck this option.


… for Codecs & Media

Tip #964: Apple Updates Compressor

Larry Jordan – LarryJordan.com

Better LUT support is the key feature in this release.

New media conversion options in Apple Compressor.

Topic $TipTopic

Last week, Apple continued the evolutionary growth of Compressor – to version 4.4.7 – along with updates for Motion and Compressor. While none of these features are revolutionary, all are useful and include:

  • Camera Log Conversion. You can now convert from log to SDR or HDR color spaces by apply custom camera LUTs, or using built-in LUTs for Panasonic, Sony, Canon, Blackmagic, Nikon or ARRI log formats.
  • Custom LUT effects. These allow applying third-party creative LUTs to clips for adding a custom look during compression. Compressor supports LUTs in .cube, .mga, and med file formats.

Both of these new features are especially helpful for on-set DIT work, converting camera masters into something more visually pleasing for initial review and rough editing.

NOTE: LUTs applied to media being transcoded are permanently attached to the media.

Compressor 4.4.7 also includes:

  • Improved speed and reliability using distributed processing over SMB.
  • Create ProRes IMF Packages including support for multiple languages.
  • Support for playback of PNG movie files.
  • Fixes an issue in which droplets would not recognize .m4v files.
  • Fixes an issue where a DV codec with a 709 Color Profile fails to transcode.
  • Fixes an issue in which image sequences may export with the incorrect color bit depth.
  • Fixes an issue where a system could run out of memory when the Active tab is open while processing a batch on a MacBook Pro with Touch Bar

These free updates are accessed through the Mac App Store.

EXTRA CREDIT

Here’s a link to learn more.


… for Adobe Premiere Pro CC

Tip #971: A Secret Tip to Moving Markers

Larry Jordan – LarryJordan.com

Including sequence markers means all your marker data travels with your clips.

The Markers menu, showing Copy Paste Includes Sequence Markers (I removed the middle section.)

Topic $TipTopic

There’s a feature in Premiere that’s turned off by default that you might want to enable if you use markers a lot. Here’s what it does.

At the bottom of the Markers menu is a choice that is disabled by default: Copy Paste Includes Sequence Markers.

If you are someone who adds lots of markers to your sequence, or uses marker names, colors or descriptions, you probably noticed that when you copy a clip from one sequence to another all that timeline marker information is lost when you paste. Sigh…

NOTE: This is not true if the markers are in the clips themselves; clip markers always travel with a clip.

However, when you turn this setting on, whenever you select timeline clips that have timeline markers above them, the markers will copy and paste as well as the clips.

Cool!


… for Apple Final Cut Pro X

Tip #944: Change Library Storage Locations

Larry Jordan – LarryJordan.com

This option organizes your media, while still keeping it external.

The Storage Locations panel, which is part of Library Properties.

Topic $TipTopic

By default, Final Cut Pro X either stores media in the library file, or points to its current storage location somewhere else on your system. But… there’s a third option that may make more sense for your project.

  • Select a Library in the Library List.
  • In the Inspector, click Modify Settings for Storage Locations.
  • Use the Media pop-up menu (see screen shot), to create a new, external, folder to store all files imported into this project.

Files from other locations will be copied into this location.

The benefits to using a custom library folder are:

  • Media is still stored outside the library; making it accessible to other projects and applications
  • Media is stored in one place, which makes moving libraries, backups, and archives a LOT easier.
  • Each Library can have its own custom folder, which simplifies organizing media by project.
  • It is still easy to share the same media between projects.

EXTRA CREDIT

The only downside to this option is that media is copied into this folder, which may increase total storage requirements.