… for Adobe Premiere Pro CC

Tip #1290: Top Ten Tips of 2020 for Adobe Premiere Pro

Larry Jordan – LarryJordan.com

It is fascinating to see what readers find interesting!

Topic $TipTopic

During this last year, The Inside Tips published 975 tips and techniques covering six subject categories:

  • Adobe Premiere
  • Apple Final Cut Pro
  • Apple Motion
  • Codecs & Media
  • Random Media Weirdness
  • Visual Effects

Here are three “Top Ten Tips Lists:” The first shows the most popular tips covering Adobe Premiere Pro. The second list shows the Top Ten most read tips across all categories. The third list shows the highest rated tips across all categories sorted by votes.

TOP 10 INSIDE TIPS FOR 2020
FOR ADOBE PREMIERE PRO

  1. Tip #479: Copy and Paste Masks in Premiere
  2. Tip #283: AAF vs. EDL vs. OMF Export
  3. Tip #523: What is Multicam Flattening?
  4. Tip #948: What’s a Rectified Waveform?
  5. Tip #621: Color Management Secret in Premiere
  6. Tip #737: 5 Interesting Audio Preferences
  7. Tip #470: Improve Chroma-keys in Premiere
  8. Tip #911: The Skin Tone Line is Your Friend
  9. Tip #803: Optimize the Audio Meters
  10. Tip #511: Relink Missing Media in Premiere

NOTE: Tips are sorted by views, most views listed first.


 

TOP 10 INSIDE TIPS of 2020
(Sorted by Views)

  1. Tip #479: Copy and Paste Masks in Premiere
  2. Tip #283: AAF vs. EDL vs. OMF Export
  3. Tip #413: Mask Multiple Clips with an Adjustment Layer
  4. Tip #474: DNxHR vs. ProRes
  5. Tip #329: Blurs and Mosaics are No Longer Safe
  6. Tip #592: Make Zooms More Interesting
  7. Tip #957: Apple Supports VP9 in macOS Big Sur
  8. Tip #1135: Boost and Smooth Dialog Levels
  9. Tip #715: How to Reset FCP X to Fix Problems
  10. Tip #342: Uses for Emoji in Final Cut Pro X

NOTE: Tips are sorted by views, most views listed first.


 

TOP 10 INSIDE TIPS of 2020
(Sorted by Ratings)

  1. Tip #742: The Best Advice to Keep Your Cool
  2. Tip #614: What is the Alpha Channel
  3. Tip #580: The History of Storyboards
  4. Tip #911: The Skin Tone Line is Your Friend
  5. Tip #515: Using the Active Camera Menu
  6. Tip #631: Get Freelance Work From Video Marketplaces
  7. Tip #1056: Move a Mix from Audition to Premiere
  8. Tip #624: Not All Captions Look Alike
  9. Tip #581: Create Colorful Lighting for 3D Text
  10. Tip #398: Use Watch Folders in AME for Automation

NOTE: Each tip was rated 5 out of 5. They are sorted by the number of votes each tip received, with most votes listed first.


Please rate the helpfulness of this tip.

Click on a star to rate it!

… for Apple Final Cut Pro X

Tip #1251: Add & Resize Emojis

Larry Jordan – LarryJordan.com

Emojis convey emotions – why not use them in your projects?

The Emoji picker, Smileys category – featuring Mrs. Claus.

Topic $TipTopic

This holiday season, add some emojis to spice your visuals. Here’s how to add, adjust and size them in your next project.

  • All emojis are text. So, start by adding a text clip to the timeline.
  • Place your cursor in the text clip where you want an emoji to appear.
  • Type Control + Cmd + Spacebar.
  • Double-click any emoji icon to add it to your title at the position of the cursor.

Just as with text, select an emoji and adjust its size using the Font Size controls. These will still look good at 400 points!

NOTE: Press and hold any emoji to see variations on that character (see screen shot).

EXTRA CREDIT

Emojis are much more than smiley faces. There are thousands to choose from. Scroll through the different categories to see what’s available.


… for Apple Final Cut Pro X

Tip #1277: Trim – With More Options

Larry Jordan – LarryJordan.com

“Crop & Feather” is more accurately called “Trim & Feather.”

A cropped & feathered clip, with the settings I used to achieve this effect.

Topic $TipTopic

I create a lot of picture-in-picture effects in my projects. Recently, I discovered a way to make this process faster. Here’s how.

We often trim a clip to hide portions of the image so we can see the image beneath. Trimming (which Photoshop calls “masking”) hides part of the image without changing its size.

NOTE: Cropping on the other hand, removes portions of the image, then changes its size to fill the frame.

The Crop & Feather effect (Effects > Distortion) both trims a clip and adds feathering – either to the inside or out – of the trimmed clip. This means we don’t need to use a separate effect simply to feather the edges of a trimmed image.

In the screen shot, I trimmed the image to focus on the tree, then feathered the edges to the inside.

The screen shot shows the settings I used to achieve this.


… for Apple Motion

Tip #1258: Change Keyframe Ease In/Out Speed

Larry Jordan – LarryJordan.com

Bezier control dots adjust Ease In/Out speeds and the shape of the motion path.

Drag the white Bezier control dot to or from the keyframe to change Ease In/Out speeds.

Topic $TipTopic

I discovered this tip while researching a recent PowerUP webinar. We can change the ease-in / ease-out speed when animating objects using keyframes.

Ease In and Ease Out refer to the acceleration of an object when it is animated using keyframes.

  • Ease In. The speed of an object approaching a keyframe.
  • Ease Out. The speed of an object leaving a keyframe.

By default, all keyframes in Motion have both Ease In and Ease Out applied. This means an object accelerates when leaving a keyframe and decelerates when approaching a keyframe.

You can change the speed of this acceleration after applying a keyframe by selecting the keyframed object in the Layers panel, then click the keyframe you want to adjust.

This reveals a thin white line with a white dot at the end of it. (This line is called a Bezier control handle.) Drag the dot along the motion path line to change the Ease In/Out speeds.

NOTE: Dragging the dot around the keyframe puts a curve into the motion path (the dotted red line).

EXTRA CREDIT

Control-click a keyframe and set it to Linear to have a constant speed between keyframes.


… for Adobe Premiere Pro CC

Tip #1264: Where Premiere Stores Metadata?

Larry Jordan – LarryJordan.com

Metadata is great – but search is limited only to clips currently open in Premiere.

The Metadata panel in Adobe Premiere Pro.

Topic $TipTopic

You spend all this time entering labels and other metadata for the clips in your project. Where does Premiere store this data and can you use it again?

A great strength of Premiere is the extensive metadata (labeling) support inside every project. For example, select a clip, or group of clips. Switch to the Metadata panel and add labels for the selected clips. Finally, go to the Project panel and search for any of the terms you entered.

NOTE: A good option for adding metadata is to use the Dublin core fields. Learn more here.

This search is extremely fast and covers all manually-entered metatdata. So, whenever you need a clip, you can quickly search for it using the relevant metadata.

The bad news is that you can’t access this data outside of Premiere because this metadata is only stored inside each Premiere project. If a project isn’t open or if you try to use the Finder to find a clip, all this metadata is hidden.

One ray of hope is that if you drag a clip from one project to another inside Premiere, all its metadata travels with it.

EXTRA CREDIT

This inability to find clips based on metadata stored in Premiere is one of the key reasons asset management software exists. With a MAM, you enter the metadata into the MAM and can then search for files and transfer them with their metadata into different Premiere projects quickly and easily.


… for Adobe Premiere Pro CC

Tip #1265: Dublin Core Metadata

Larry Jordan – LarryJordan.com

Dublin Core provides a standardized way to identify and find resources, including media.

The DCMI logo – note the use of 15 dots.

Topic $TipTopic

I was wondering about what Dublin Core metadata actually is. So, I looked it up.

The original Dublin Core of thirteen (later fifteen) elements was designed to standardize key labels about resources. It was first published in a report from a workshop in 1995. It was formalized into ISO, ANSI/NISO and IETF standards a few years later.

NOTE: “Dublin” refers to Dublin, Ohio, USA where the schema originated during the 1995 invitational OCLC/NCSA Metadata Workshop. “Core” refers to the metadata terms as “broad and generic being usable for describing a wide range of resources”.

The resources described using the Dublin Core may be digital resources (video, images, web pages, etc), as well as physical resources such as books or CDs, and objects like artworks.

From this initial paper, the Dublin Core Metadata Initiative (DCMI) evolved into the role of “de facto” standards agency by maintaining its own, updated documentation for DCMI Metadata Terms. The DCMI Usage Board currently serves as the maintenance agency for the ISO spec.

For more than twenty years, the DCMI community has developed and curated Dublin Core Specifications. More recently, DCMI has become recognised as a trusted steward of metadata vocabularies, concept schemes and other metadata artefacts, and has taken responsibility for other community-created specifications. DCMI remains committed to this important work, and is actively developing more efficient and sustainable approaches to the stewardship of these standards.

EXTRA CREDIT

Here’s a link to the DCMI website.


… for Adobe Premiere Pro CC

Tip #1266: Interpreting an Alpha Channel

Larry Jordan – LarryJordan.com

Alpha channels are the magic that make compositing and most effects possible.

Viewing the alpha channel: White is opaque, black is transparent & gray is translucent.

Topic $TipTopic

The process of adding an alpha channel to an image – at the developer level – is highly complex. Fortunately, we don’t need to understand how the channel is added to take advantage of it.

Just as the red, blue and green channels describe the amount of red, blue or green in each pixel, the alpha channel describes the amount of transparency in each pixel. An alpha channel provides a way to store images and their transparency information in a single file without disturbing the color channels.

Many file formats can include an alpha channel, including Adobe Photoshop, ElectricImage, TGA, TIFF, EPS, PDF, and Adobe Illustrator. ProRes, AVI and QuickTime (saved at a bit depth of Millions Of Colors+), also can contain alpha channels, depending upon the codecs used to generate these file types.

Alpha channels store transparency information in files in one of two ways: straight or premultiplied. Although the alpha channels are the same, the color channels differ.

With straight (or unmatted) channels, transparency information is stored only in the alpha channel, not in any of the visible color channels. With straight channels, the effects of transparency aren’t visible until the image is displayed in an application that supports straight channels.

With premultiplied (or matted) channels, transparency information is stored in the alpha channel and also in the visible RGB channels, which are multiplied with a background color. The colors of semitransparent areas, such as feathered edges, are shifted toward the background color in proportion to their degree of transparency.

Some software lets you specify the background color with which the channels are premultiplied; otherwise, the background color is usually black or white.

Straight channels retain more accurate color information than premultiplied channels. While premultiplied channels are compatible with a wider range of programs, such as Apple QuickTime Player.

Often, the choice of whether to use images with straight or premultiplied channels has been made before you receive the assets to edit and composite. Premiere Pro and After Effects recognize both straight and premultiplied channels, but only the first alpha channel they encounter in a file containing multiple alpha channels.

ProRes 4444 is a good choice when you need to create or transfer clips with alpha channels.

Alpha channels are supported in all NLEs, and there are dozens of articles on the web detailing how to work with them to create a variety of different effects.


… for Apple Final Cut Pro X

Tip #1259: Change Keyframe Ease In/Out Speed

Larry Jordan – LarryJordan.com

Bezier control dots adjust Ease In/Out speeds and the shape of the motion path.

Drag the Bezier control handle along the motion path to change the Ease In/Out speed.

Topic $TipTopic

I discovered this tip while researching a recent PowerUP webinar. We can change the ease-in / ease-out speed when animating objects in Final Cut using keyframes.

Ease In and Ease Out refer to the acceleration of an object when it is animated using keyframes.

  • Ease In. The speed of an object approaching a keyframe.
  • Ease Out. The speed of an object leaving a keyframe.

By default, all keyframes in Final Cut Pro have both Ease In and Ease Out applied. This means an object accelerates when leaving a keyframe and decelerates when approaching a keyframe.

Here’s how to change the speed of this acceleration after applying a keyframe:

  • Select the clip in the timeline.
  • Rotate the object to move the position of the rotation handle.
  • Grab the small white dot at the end of the thin white line attached to the keyframe. (This line is called a Bezier control handle.)
  • Drag the dot along the motion path line to change the Ease In / Out speed.

NOTE: Dragging the dot around the keyframe puts a curve into the motion path (the dotted red line).

EXTRA CREDIT

Once you’ve adjusted the Ease In/Out speed, you can unrotate the object to the angle you need.

Control-click a keyframe and set it to Linear to have a constant speed between keyframes.


… for Apple Final Cut Pro X

Tip #1260: How to Burn Timecode Into Video

Larry Jordan – LarryJordan.com

This generator can display either project or source clip timecode.

(Drone image courtesy of Terry Holland.)

Topic $TipTopic

Final Cut Pro provides a fast way to add timecode to your review videos using a generator.

Add Generator > Elements > Timecode to the top layer of your project. Final Cut will automatically superimpose it over all lower video layers.

In the Video Inspector, you can change:

  • Whether to display project or source clip timecode
  • The position of the timecode
  • Font, size and color
  • Background color
  • The starting timecode number
  • The label that appears to the left of the timecode (“Fly-Fishing” in the screen shot).

This feature makes it easy for both you and the people reviewing your videos to be sure you are talking about the same point of your project.


… for Apple Motion

Tip #1243: Hidden Clip Control Options

Larry Jordan – LarryJordan.com

Controls, behaviors, and filters are all available from this contextual menu.

Control-click a video clip in the Motion Viewer to reveal this menu. (Image courtesy of StandardFilms.com.)

Topic $TipTopic

There is a wealth of clip control options hidden in the Motion Viewer. The trick is finding them.

Here’s the secret: Control-click a video clip that’s placed in the Viewer to reveal the options shown in the screen shot.

NOTE: Clicking in the Viewer, without clicking on a clip, does not reveal this menu.

From this menu, you can select a variety of tools, behaviors, filters and other options.