… for Adobe Premiere Pro CC

Tip #133: Open Sequences Between Projects

Larry Jordan – https://LarryJordan.com

Premiere supports opening unlimited sequences from any project!

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Premiere allows you to open (more accurately, “import””) one or more sequences from different projects. This makes it easy to share work between projects. Here’s how:

  • Open, or create, the project into which you want to import a sequence.
  • Open the Media Browser.
  • Navigate to the project file that contains the sequence you want to open. Then, double-click it.
  • A message appears saying that Premiere is starting the Dynamic Link database. This technology allows different Adobe apps to share data between apps.
  • After a few more seconds, all the sequences, bins and clips in that project are displayed in the Media Browser.
  • Right-click the sequence you want and choose Import.

Virtually instantly, this project will appear in the Program panel.

NOTE: This simply imports a sequence, it doesn’t link them. Any changes you make are not reflected back to the original project.


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… for Adobe Premiere Pro CC

Tip #022: 2 Export Options You Don’t Need

Larry Jordan – https://LarryJordan.com

These options have been puzzling editors for years.

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You are ready to export your final project, when you come face-to-face with two inscrutable checkboxes. Ever wonder how to set these options in the Export window of Premiere? We’ve got the answer.

  • Maximum Bit Depth. If you have a GPU, Maximum Bit Depth is irrelevant as you’re already getting that performance from the GPU, if it is applicable to your media. Turn this off.
  • Maximum Render Quality. If you have a GPU, this, too can be turned off. The only reason to turn it on is if you are scaling your images – up or down – and see jagged edges on clearly defined diagonal lines. As of this time, scaling is still CPU-based, and only effects calculated using the CPU are affected by this setting.

Now you know.

As you can probably guess, as Adobe migrates from CPU-based effects to GPU-based effects both of these options will become unnecessary and probably disappear.


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… for Adobe Premiere Pro CC

Tip #007: Magic Markers

Larry Jordan – https://LarryJordan.com

Five Marker Tricks That Help You Get Organized

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To add a marker, position the playhead in the timeline where you want to locate a marker and type M. This adds a Cue marker at the position of the playhead.

  • Shift + M jumps the playhead to the next marker
  • Shift + Cmd + M (Windows: Shift + Cntrl + M) jumps the playhead to the previous marker.
  • Option + M deletes the selected marker.

To convert a marker to a range marker, double-click the marker icon, then give it a duration.

Once you create a marker press – / [forward slash] – this selects the marker name in the Marker panel so you can quickly rename the marker. If the Marker panel is not open, press – / – twice.

EXTRA CREDIT

The default marker name can be changed in Preferences > Markers & Metadata


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… for Adobe Premiere Pro CC

Tip #041: Optimizing Premiere Transition Preferences

Larry Jordan – https://LarryJordan.com

Premiere’s defaults aren’t bad. But they aren’t very good, either.

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Preferences are exactly that – YOUR preferences on how the software should work. This means that you can set your preferences however you want. But, as a starting point to your own modifications, let me share some of my preferences with you. Use or modify these in whatever ways seem good to you.

Preferences > Timeline

The hidden “gotcha” with the transition settings are that they use frames to determine durations. Which is fine – until your frame rates change. At which point, all these durations need to change as well.

  • Video. I prefer transitional dissolves that last 2/3 of a second; a one-second transition just hangs on screen for too long. However, I also shoot mostly 60 fps material. So I change this to 40 frames (40/60 = 2/3).
  • Audio Transition. Most of the time, I like a 1/4 second fade-up, while for fade-outs, I prefer about one second.  Sadly, Premiere only allows me to pick one so I generally leave this at the default.
  • Still image. Here’s a cool tip. If you are building a still image montage set to music, figure out the duration between beats, then import all your stills to match that duration. This means you can edit stills into the timeline without setting an In or an Out.
  • Timeline Playback Auto-Scrolling. It takes more CPU power, but Smooth Scroll looks nicer. Use Page Scroll on slower systems, as it uses less CPU overhead.
  • Timeline mouse scrolling. Vertical allows you to quickly scroll up in projects that use many stacked clips. Most of my edits are five tracks or less, so I change this to Horizontal, so I can quickly move around the timeline.

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… for Adobe Premiere Pro CC

Tip #094: Premiere and ProRes

Larry Jordan – https://LarryJordan.com

Premiere now supports ProRes

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If you are looking for a good intermediate codec to transcode highly-compressed media (such as H.264, AVCHD, or HEVC) into something easier to edit, Premiere now supports all flavors of ProRes on both Mac and Windows.

The first version of Premiere to support ProRes on Windows was 13.02. (ProRes on the Mac has been supported for a long time.) And the latest release of Premiere (Fall, 2019) has improved ProRes handling on both Mac and Windows.


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… for Adobe Premiere Pro CC

Tip #114: Optimize Your Content with Auto-Frame

Larry Jordan – https://LarryJordan.com

New Feature in Fall 2019 Release

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New in the Fall, 2019, release of Adobe Premiere, Auto Reframe “can be applied to individual clips as an effect or to whole sequences. Auto Reframe identifies the action in your video to ensure that what’s important stays within the output frame. When you are applying Auto Reframe, you can adjust the sensitivity of the algorithm, depending on the amount of motion within your footage. You can further refine the results by adjusting the keyframes after Auto Reframe has worked its magic.” (Adobe blog)

We’ll have more on this feature in coming weeks.


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… for Adobe Premiere Pro CC

Tip #115: Finally! Gain Worth Talking About.

Larry Jordan – https://LarryJordan.com

New Feature in Fall 2019 Release

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The range for audio gain for clips in Premiere has expanded to +15 dB.

With higher bit rates for digital audio captured by modern cameras and recorders, signal levels can have more variation, without the problems inherent to analog media like tape.

Increasing maximum audio gain from +6 dB to +15 dB means you can increase clip volume without additional amplification effects, making the workflow simpler, more precise, and bringing Premiere Pro in line with audio levels in Adobe Audition.

Gain can be adjusted by dragging the volume line in an audio clip, or by adjusting levels in Effect Controls.


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… for Adobe Premiere Pro CC

Tip #116: Premiere Now Exports HDR-10 Media.

Larry Jordan – https://LarryJordan.com

New Feature in Fall 2019 Release

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Editors can now export HDR content with HDR10 metadata to ensure projects look their best on HDR-enabled displays. Adjusting variables, such as display color primaries and luminance in a the HDR10 export dialog, allows you to deliver content that adapts your images for the display device.

Output settings are controlled in the Export dialog. (These also apply to Adobe Media Encoder.)

We’ll cover this feature more in future weeks.


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… for Adobe Premiere Pro CC

Tip #032: What’s A Cache?

Larry Jordan – https://LarryJordan.com

Cache files are work files that need some periodic attention.

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Just as when you are working on a math problem and you have a separate piece of paper to help with the intermediate steps, so also does Premiere. These are called “cache files,” or work files, because they are stored (cached) while you are working on your project.

These work files are generally not viewable by us, just as your personal notes may only make sense to you. But they are nonetheless essential.

While necessary, these don’t need to be retained after a project is done. In fact, it’s a good idea to clean all cache files on a regular basis; say, a couple of times a month or so. (If Premiere needs these files again in the future, it will rebuild them. So, there’s no risk of deleting something you actually need.)

Preferences > Media Cache

You can change the location of where cache files are stored. Where possible, I recommend storing them in a different location from your media files. Using your internal storage is often a good place, because these files benefit from the extra speed an internal device provides and you can erase the files when you are done.

Make a point to delete unused files every month or so, to regain storage space. Also, there is never a reason to archive cache files.

On my system, I also automatically delete cache files older than 90 days.

BONUS

I make a point to rename my cache file folder so I know what’s inside. This isn’t necessary, but I find it helpful; for example, “Premiere Cache Files.”


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… for Adobe Premiere Pro CC

Tip #045: Preview Faster

Larry Jordan – https://LarryJordan.com

In this case, it’s OK – and fast! – to “play around.”

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This is a very fast way to preview a transition.

Using the arrow keys, position the playhead on the transition you want to preview.

Press Shift + K.

Instantly, the playhead backs up a few seconds, plays through the position of the playhead, then stops a few seconds afterward.

EXTRA CREDIT

You can set how far back or forward the playhead moves with this shortcut using Preferences > Playback:

  • Preroll. Sets how far back the playhead starts.
  • Postroll. Sets how for past the playhead position the playback ends.

By increasing these durations you can use this technique to preview short segments, not just transitions.


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