… for Apple Motion

Tip #775: Examine and Alter Media Clip Properties

Larry Jordan – LarryJordan.com

Inspector > Media changes the character of the media itself.

The Inspector > Media pane for a selected clip in Apple Motion.

Topic $TipTopic

Have you ever selected a clip in Motion, then looked at the source media controls in the Inspector? Yeah, me neither. But there’s some cool stuff there. Take a look.

To show this pane:

  • Click Media in the Project pane.
  • Select the clip you want to review.
  • Open Inspector > Media (see screen shot).

This pane allows you to change:

  • Alpha (transparency)
  • Color space
  • Pixel aspect ratio
  • Field order (interlacing)
  • Frame rate
  • And more…

EXTRA CREDIT

Here’s an Apple Support page with more details.


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… for Apple Motion

Tip #776: Copy & Paste Into a Region in Motion

Larry Jordan – LarryJordan.com

We can select a region in the timeline, then copy and paste into it.

A region (lighter color) selected in the timeline.

Topic $TipTopic

In Motion, we can make changes to a range of frames, known as a region. For example, you can cut or copy a section of time to remove it from your project completely, or just move it to a new position in Timeline. Regions need not align with object edges in the Timeline—you can create a region that begins midway through an object.

You can also paste objects into a defined region using the Paste Special command, which lets you insert, overwrite, or exchange objects in the Timeline. Additionally, you select a region and insert blank frames, creating an empty placeholder for a clip you don’t yet have.

Here’s how to paste into a selected region:

  1. In Motion, select an object.
  2. Press Cmd + C to copy or Command-X to cut your selection.
  3. Press and hold the Command and Option keys, drag in the timeline ruler to select a region.
  4. Choose Edit > Paste Special.
  5. The Paste Special dialog appears.
  6. Select “Insert into time region” or “Overwrite into time region,” then click OK.

The Clipboard contents are pasted into the region using the method you specified.

NOTE: This requires selecting a region in the Timeline, not the mini-timeline.

EXTRA CREDIT

Here’s an Apple Support page with more options about working with regions.


… for Apple Motion

Tip #777: Keyframes vs. Behaviors

Larry Jordan – LarryJordan.com

Use Keyframes for precise control over specific parameters.

Keyframes illustrated in the Motion Timeline.

Topic $TipTopic

When should you use keyframes instead of Behaviors? This Apple KnowledgeBase post has the answer.

As an alternative to animating with behaviors, you can animate most text parameters using keyframes. The text animation method you use (keyframing or behaviors) depends on your project, or more specifically, your timing needs:

  • Use keyframes if you need an action to happen at a specific point in time in your project. For example, if you want text to be completely transparent at frame 1, become completely opaque at frame 60, become transparent again at frame 90, and opaque again at frame 120, use keyframing. Keyframes apply specific values to an object’s parameters at specific frames.
  • Use behaviors if the timing of the animation doesn’t need to be precise. For example, if you want the text to be completely transparent at frame 1, become opaque over frames 60–90, and become transparent by frame 120, use the Fade In/Fade Out behavior. Behaviors generate a range of values that are applied to an object’s parameters.

You can combine keyframing and behaviors to animate any object in Motion. For example, if you keyframe text opacity, you can then apply the Tracking behavior to animate text tracking, or you can keyframe the Tracking parameter. However, if you keyframe the text Opacity parameter and then apply a Fade In/Fade Out behavior to the text, unexpected results may occur.


… for Adobe Premiere Pro CC

Tip #772: A Preference for Faster Trimming

Larry Jordan – LarryJordan.com

These preference settings are off by default.

Trim preference settings in Premiere. Check the top box.

Topic $TipTopic

There is a trimming preference setting that can speed trimming your clips. However, it is off by default. Here’s what you need to know to turn this on.

Open Preferences > Trim and check the top box.

  • Allow Selection tool… This changes the cursor to the Ripple or Roll trimming tools depending upon where it is located relative to the edit point.

For example, hover the cursor near the Out and the cursor changes to a Ripple trim. Hover it over the edit point, and it automatically changes to a Roll trim. Near the In switches to the Ripple tool again.

When this option is not checked, hovering over an edit point displays the Trim In/Out tool, which is less helpful than Ripple and Roll.


… for Apple Motion

Tip #750: What Are Simulation Behaviors?

Larry Jordan – LarryJordan.com

Simulation behaviors are very simple ways to create complex motion.

The Simulation Behavior submenu in Apple Motion.

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The following text is from the Apple Motion Help files.

Simulation behaviors perform one of two tasks. Some Simulation behaviors, such as Gravity, animate the parameters of an object in a way that simulates a real-world phenomenon. Other Simulation behaviors, such as Attractor and Repel, affect the parameters of objects surrounding the object to which they’re applied. These behaviors allow you to create sophisticated interactions among multiple objects in your project with minimal adjustments. Like the Basic Motion behaviors, Simulation behaviors also affect specific object parameters. Examples include Attractor, Gravity, and Repel.

Important: Several Simulation behavior parameters contain object wells into which you drag target objects used as attractors, repellers, orbiters, and so on. Dragging an object to a well can be tricky—be sure to drag the object name (or thumbnail) from the Layers list to the object well in the Inspector without releasing the mouse button until the pointer is over the object well. If you click the object in the Layers list and release the mouse button, that behavior object is deselected its parameters are no longer displayed in the Inspector. This applies to all object wells, including mask source wells and image wells.


… for Apple Motion

Tip #751: 16 Simulation Behaviors & What They Do

Larry Jordan – LarryJordan.com

The easiest way to learn these is to play with them and see what they do.

The Simulation Behavior submenu in Apple Motion.

Topic $TipTopic

The following text is from the Apple Motion Help files.

There are 16 Simulation behaviors in Motion:

  • Align to Motion behavior changes the orientation of an object to match its direction along an animation path.
  • Attracted To behavior in Motion pulls an affected object toward a designated target.
  • Attractor behavior in Motion pulls objects toward the affected object.
  • Drag behavior in Motion simulates the force of friction on a moving object, slowing it down over time.
  • Drift Attracted To behavior in Motion pulls an affected object toward a designated target, then makes the object come to rest, rather than overshooting the target and bouncing around.
  • Drift Attractor behavior in Motion pulls other objects toward the affected object, then makes those objects come to rest, rather than overshooting the affected object and bouncing around.
  • Edge Collision behavior in Motion causes an object to collide with and bounce off the edges of the canvas frame.
  • Gravity behavior in Motion causes an object to fall over time.
  • Orbit Around behavior in Motion causes the affected object to circle around a designated target.
  • Random Motion behavior animates an object along a random path.
  • Repel behavior in Motion pushes objects away from the affected object.
  • Repel From behavior in Motion pushes the affected object away from a designated target.
  • Rotational Drag behavior in Motion simulates the force of friction on spinning objects.
  • Spring behavior in Motion causes the affected object to move back and forth around a designated target.
  • Vortex behavior in Motion causes objects to circle around the affected object.
  • Wind behavior in Motion “blows” an object in a specified direction.

… for Apple Motion

Tip #752: 3 Highly-Intriguing Simulation Behaviors

Larry Jordan – LarryJordan.com

These behaviors have lots of uses – and are fun to play with.

Orbit Around and Align to Motion behaviors applied to the arrow.

Topic $TipTopic

Here are three behaviors that are fun to play with – and useful at the same time. (This text is from the Apple Motion Help files.)

  • Align to Motion. This changes the rotation of an object to match changes made to its direction along an animation path. This behavior is meant to be combined with Simulation behaviors that animate the position of an object or with a keyframed animation path you create yourself. Unlike the Snap Alignment to Motion behavior, which produces absolute changes in rotation that precisely match changes in direction, Align to Motion has a springy reaction and creates a more lively effect.

NOTE: The Align to Motion behavior does not work on objects animated using the Motion Path behavior. Instead, use the Snap Alignment to Motion behavior (in the Basic Motion subcategory).

  • Orbit Around. This causes the affected object to circle around a designated target. Similar to the Attracted To behavior, the Orbit Around behavior’s default parameter settings give the object sufficient initial velocity to orbit around another object in a perfect circle.
  • Repel. This pushes objects away from the affected object. If you apply the Repel behavior to an object, that object pushes away all other objects within the area of influence in the canvas. The strength with which objects are pushed away can be increased or decreased, as can the distance repelled objects travel. I find this simulation works really well flying an object through a field of particles, pushing the particles away from the object.

… for Apple Motion

Tip #720: Motion Path vs. Throw

Larry Jordan – LarryJordan.com

Throw is straight-line movement. Motion Path offers more complexity.

The Throw behavior, top, versus Motion Path, bottom.

Topic $TipTopic

Apple Motion has two behaviors that seem to do the same thing: Throw and Motion Path. What’s the difference?

The Throw behavior (Basic Motion > Throw) moves the selected object in a straight line, based upon settings in the HUD.

The Motion Path behavior (Basic Motion > Motion Path) provides a fixed starting point, a fixed ending point and the ability to add curves along the path.

NOTE: To add a curve to a Motion Path, double-click the red line, then adjust the two white curve controls.

As with all Motion effects, the speed of the effect is based upon its duration in the timeline (or mini-timeline).


… for Apple Motion

Tip #721: Secrets of the Spin Behavior

Larry Jordan – LarryJordan.com

The Spin behavior can spin on any axis; you just need to know where to click.

The Spin behavior rotating clock-wise around both the X and Y axes.

Topic $TipTopic

There’s a hidden feature in the Spin behavior that can add visual interest to your movement: Pseudo-3D. Here’s how it works.

When you apply the Spin behavior (Basic Motion > Spin) to an element, we are used to dragging the arrow at the top to get an object spinning.

The secret is the blue arrow at the center. This determines the axis around which the rotation (spin) takes place.

NOTE: This 3D movement works whether a group is set for 2D or 3D.

One of my favorite tricks is to spin an element on the Y-axis, which creates the illusion of spinning it back into 3D space.

EXTRA CREDIT

  • Press and hold the Shift key while dragging the top edge to constrain movement to the Y-axis.
  • Press and hold the Shift key while dragging the left edge to constrain movement to the X-axis.
  • To reset this effect, select it, then go to Inspector > Behaviors and click the Reset Parameter setting.

… for Apple Motion

Tip #722: Apple Motion: The Move Behavior

Larry Jordan – LarryJordan.com

The Move behavior moves an element to or from a target.

The green arrow is moving toward the target, which was placed inside the blue ball.

Topic $TipTopic

The Move behavior (Basic Motion > Move) moves a selected element to or from a target. This is a really easy way to create directed movement. Here’s how it works.

The Move behavior provides more control than a Throw, but less than a Motion Path.

  • Select a layer in the Layers panel.
  • Choose Behavior > Basic Motion > Move
  • Position the playhead at the start of the effect
  • Drag the element to its starting position
  • Drag the target (white circle) where you want the element to move

When you play the project, the selected object (green arrow, in my example) moves in a straight line to or from the target.

NOTE: You can’t add curves to the Move behavior.

EXTRA CREDIT

Select the Move behavior. In the Inspector, you can change the direction of the movement (To or From), as well as the acceleration.